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Heart Disease Statistics

In 2002, heart disease statistics show that 696,947 people died of heart disease (51% of them women). This was 29% of all U.S. deaths. The age–adjusted death rate was 241 per 100,000 populations.

In 2006, heart disease is projected to cost more than $258 billion, including health care services, medications, and lost productivity.

Worldwide, coronary heart disease kills more than 7 million people each year.

Risk factors for heart disease among adults (for years 1999–2002 unless noted):

  • Percentage of persons aged 20 years and older with hypertension or taking hypertension medications: 30.2

  • Percentage of persons aged 20 years and older with high blood cholesterol: 17.3%

  • Percentage of persons aged 20 years and older with physician–diagnosed diabetes: 6.5%Percentage of persons aged 20 years and older who are obese: 30.5%

  • Percentage of adults aged 18 years and older who are current cigarette smokers (2003): 21.6%

  • Percentage of adults aged 18 years and older who engage in no leisure–time physical activity (2003): 37.6%

In 2003, approximately 37% of adults reported having two or more of six risk factors for heart disease and stroke (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, current smoking, physical inactivity, and obesity).

Timely access to emergency cardiac care and survival is partly dependent on early recognition of heart attack symptoms and immediate action by calling emergency services. In a 2001 survey, most persons (95%) recognized chest pain as a heart attack symptom, but only 11% correctly classified all symptoms and knew to call 9–1–1 when someone was having a heart attack.

Heart disease statistics among people with heart disease have shown that lowering high blood cholesterol and high blood pressure can reduce the risk of dying of heart disease, having a nonfatal heart attack, and needing heart bypass surgery or angioplasty.

Studies among people without heart disease have shown that lowering high blood cholesterol and high blood pressure can reduce the risk of developing heart disease.

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